UK Gov’s “ENOUGH” campaign extended with added OOH/digital elements

enough-uk-gov-fcb-inferno.jpg

The Home Office has launched the second phase of its “ENOUGH – Violence Against Women And Girls” campaign created by FCB Inferno.

Encouraging the public to challenge perpetrators of abuse against women and girls, the campaign, by FCB Inferno reprises the TV ad (below) that ran in March this year and includes a range of new supporting digital, radio and out-of-home executions.

ENOUGH tackles harassment of women and girls

Seeking to mobilise bystanders to safely disrupt the abuse of women and girls in a variety of situations, the campaign draws on locations where violence against women most commonly occurs and shows actions the public can take to stop the abusive behaviour. 

The advertising is based on audience insights and informed by an advisory group of over 40 voluntary sector organisations, survivors and academics who have given their expert insight.

The TV ad portrays examples of harassment faced by women or girls and shows bystanders challenging the abuse.

Shot by photographer, David Stewart, the new out-of-home executions show a range of scenarios including one, a group of bus travellers shown observing an act of harassment. 

Front-of-beermat
Get the message: ENOUGH campaign aims to spread abuse message wider.

The ad poses the question: “Enough. If you saw a man harassing a woman, what would you do?” 

Thought bubbles suggest actions the travellers would take. One thinks: “I’ll ask the driver to help.” Another thinks: “I’ll interrupt and ask what the next stop is.”

In another billboard execution, a group of office workers see a female colleague being harassed off camera. 

One thinks: “I’ll ask if she wants to report it to HR”, while another thinks: “I’ll call him out.” And a third execution asks: “If you saw signs your friend’s partner is controlling her, what would you do?” 

One friend thinks: “I’ll wait until we’re alone and ask if she needs help.” Another thought bubble says: “We’ll call the domestic abuse helpline.”

Creating a new social norm

The campaign aims to create a new social norm by giving the general public confidence to act against abuse, so perpetrators know that their actions will not be tolerated.

On the launch of the new work, the Minister for Safeguarding, Mims Davies, said: “There is no place in our society for cowardly acts of violence against women and girls.

“Abuse comes in many forms, and by standing against all of them, and holding perpetrators accountable, we can create a society where women and girls are safe.

“This campaign is part of this vision. However, there is more to be done, and I am committed to continuing this vital work.”

VAWG_Tube_Cross_Track_01
Call to action: ENOUGH campaign encourages public to help safely when they spot abusive behvaiour.

Emily Whiteaway, Business Director at FCB Inferno, added: “We all have the power to end violence against women and girls but it’s important we know how to speak up and act safely when we, as bystanders, see it happening. 

“The latest creative arms the public with a range of interventions, being visible and instructive in the moments they witness the abuse. 

“It simultaneously sends a clear message to perpetrators, that their behaviour will not be tolerated. It’s through this collective action and saying Enough we hope to stop the unacceptable harassment experienced by women.”

The TV, social and digital elements of the campaign go live 25 October and the out-of- home executions, including cross track billboards and contextual media such as beer mats, launch 7 November.

Moreover, the campaign is being supported by a wider roster of agencies to manage paid media, earned amplification, community engagement, digital content and partnership activity.

The campaign directs to the website gov.uk/enough  which includes information on how to safely tackle violence against women and girls, with example scenarios and a memorable mnemonic to help you remember how to STOP abuse (Say something, Tell someone, Offer support, Provide a diversion).